A different way of knitting an edging on

At a recent knitting and stitching show I noticed a shawl with an edging knitted on in a way that was new to me. The last stitch of the edging was not knitted together with the next live stitch of the body of work. Instead, this shawl's live stitches were hanging like curtain rings around the last stitch of the edging. I don't think that this can be represented with current Stitch Map symbols, so the map here ...

At a recent knitting and stitching show I noticed a shawl with an edging knitted on in a way that was new to me. The last stitch of the edging was not knitted together with the next live stitch of the body of work. Instead, this shawl's live stitches were hanging like curtain rings around the last stitch of the edging. I don't think that this can be represented with current Stitch Map symbols, so the map here shows the conventional knit together method (k3tog in this case, as this gives a good fit of edging to live stitches). However, my sample swatch has been knitted using the alternative method - instead of k3tog, do the following: pass the second and third stitches on the left hand needle over the first stitch and drop them off the needle, then knit the first stitch. That's it.

I put in the eyelet to make it clearer in the swatch photo how each pair of stitches of the body hangs off the lower stitch of the edging.

https://youtu.be/QHD_lhWzERM

Shown with a cast-on count of 18 stitches.



Getting chart...

  • Rows 1, 3, and 5 (RS): K18.
  • Rows 2 and 4: P18.
  • Row 6: P18, CO 5 sts (23 sts).
  • Row 11: K2, k2tog, yo, k3tog, turn (5 sts).
  • Rows 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, and 22: K5.
  • Rows 13, 15, 17, 19, and 21: K2, k2tog, yo, k3tog, turn.

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Cast-on count
  • 18 stitches
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  • added 14 Mar 2016
  • last edited 2 Apr 2016

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